Posts page

Events

Events

May 27, 2021“Re-Hearing: Racializing Discourses of Risk and Harm in a California Child Welfare Court”
Panel title: Falling short of an ideal: Legal gaps, failures, and a push for reform, CRN on Ethnography, Law, and Society, Law and Society Association.
May 29, 2021Reader for Author Meets Reader Event, “Taking Children: A History of American Terror”
by author Laura Briggs, CRN on Feminist Legal Theory, Law and Society Association.
June 2021“Challenging Beliefs about ‘Minimally-Fit’ Parental Care in Child Welfare Cases,” for the Strengthened Bonds: Abolishing the Child Welfare System and Re-Envisioning Child Well-Being Symposium,
Organized by The Columbia Journal of Race and Law.

Past Events

Nov 2020“Re-Hearing Stereotypes: Raciolinguistic Ideologies of Spanish Speakers in a California Child Welfare Court.”
Invited talk for The Linguistic Anthropology Laboratory, Dept. Anthropology, UC San Diego.
May 2020“The Management of Risky Parents: Evaluating Noncompliance in Child Welfare Cases.”
Law & Society Association.
Nov 2019“Establishing Jurisdiction: Conflicts in Ideologies of Adequate Parental Care in California.”
American Anthropological Association.
Sep 2019“Managing the Boundaries of Parenthood.”
Invited presentation.
American Bar Foundation Seminar Series. Chicago, IL.
Nov 2018“Linguistic Hierarchies in Family Reunification:
Barriers to ‘Good’ Parenting in U.S. Juvenile Court.”
American Anthropological Association.
Oct 2018“Linguistic Sympathy among Interpreters in Juvenile Court.”
Jurilinguistics II Conference, Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Language and Law.
University Pablo de Olavide, Spain.
Dec 2017“Language Barriers in a U.S Juvenile Dependency
Court.”
Transnational Law Summer Institute, Reproduction, Alienation, Intervention.
University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
June 2015“English vs. Spanglish: Language Contact in East Los Angeles.”
Jeunes Cherchers en Science du Langage, Contact de Langues.
Université Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris, France.

Writing

Writing

Forthcoming“Raciolinguistic Ideologies of ‘Spanish Speakers’ in a California Child Welfare Court.” In Metalinguistic Communities: Case Studies of Agency, Ideology, and Symbolic Uses of Language, edited by Netta Avineri and Jesse Harasta. Palgrave Studies in Minority Languages and Communities series. Palgrave MacMillan.
March 2019Online Interview with Jonathan Rosa on monograph, Looking Like a Language, Sounding Like a Race.
Posted March 18, 2019 on the Communication, Media, and Performance (CaMP) Anthropology Blog.

Consulting

Consulting

I have experience consulting for GreatNonProfits through the LUCA Community-Based Address Canvassing. I produced Canvassing Training Guide for LUCA (Local Update of Census Addresses) Initiative to reduce undercount of immigrants and other minoritized groups in the 2020 U.S. Census. Results of pilots conducted in Fresno and San Jose in Dec 2017 and Jan 2018 enhanced the census address list by 4-6%, representing $100 million in census driven-federal program funding.

I have also assisted child welfare courts in revising their public materials for increased accessibility to English-dominant and Spanish-dominant members of the public. 

I am available for independent consulting on issues concerning language accessibility, program design for inclusion and protection of vulnerable populations, and organizational assessments. Email me at lejessicaphd@gmail.com with details about how I might be able to support your organizational goals. 

Teaching

Teaching

My research and teaching goals are centered around the possibilities that analytical examination of taken-for-granted ideas about race, law, and language can inform transformative change. I seek to provide students with an opportunity to consider how current structures for attaining justice, restitution, acknowledgment, and reparations might be re-imagined and re-built. In my mentoring of first-generation undergraduate students for the American Bar Foundation summer research program, I have encouraged students to engage with research questions about law that are also of interest to affected communities. In encouraging students to do research on beliefs about fairness and justice through the law from the perspective of stakeholders, I emphasize that engaged research that centers questions that matter to the participants of the research simultaneously enhance the scope and significance of social science research. 

I have developed an original course on Ethnographic Methods and Community Engaged Research that encourages students to engage in community engaged research that is responsive to the interests of the people who take part in research. In this course, I emphasize that questions that matter to the stakeholders of the research can lead to transformative and expansive findings for social science. 

I am currently developing course syllabi on the Anthropology of Law, Latinxs in US Social Institutions, Language & Empire in the Americas, and Global Racializations. 

Research

Research

I ethnographically investigate racialization of Latinx communities, legal processes and experiences related to social legitimacy and distribution of social services. My research and writing attends closely to how language practices influence how law is experienced and enacted. 

My research project based on 18 months of ethnographic observation of a California child welfare court is the basis for my working book project. In this manuscript, At the Margins of Parenthood: Latinxs in Child Welfare, I outline how the construction and circulation of institutional narratives characterize low-income, Spanish-dominant, and Latinx families as routinely placing children “at risk” of harm, challenging the ability of parents to maintain or regain custody of their children. I argue that this has important implications for broader imaginaries about what minimally-fit parenting should look like and who is deemed suitable to raise future citizens of the United States.

My next project tentatively titled Raised by the State: First and Second Generation Latinx Youth in the Foster Care System, will explore how Latinx youth who have been removed from their biological parents’ custody develop their sense of identity in relation to ideas of ethnicity, language practices, and state services.

Theme: Overlay by Kaira